April 2011

Mrs. Gleave Choreographs

Attributions: 
Stacy Stapel, SJHS Staff Writer

Students here at SJHS recently saw this years school musical, “Once Upon a Mattress,” which was choreographed by Mrs. Gleave, Springville Junior High School Geometry teacher. According to her, she loved the show and loved being able to work with all the talented students of SJHS.

Performances of the play went from March 10th to the 19th; although it wasn’t performed everyday. The performances were in the SJHS auditorium.  According to Darby Farr, ninth-grade cast member, her favorite part of the play was the ‘Spanish Panic’ dance.  She said, “It was kind of hard but way fun to learn and perform; the best move was when we did Soldier Boy!”

Mrs. Gleave has a lot of experience with dancing; she has a Dance Performance Major from BYU and she has danced/choreographed professionally for years. Katya Wagstaff, who played Winifred the Woebegone, said, “I love how Mrs. Gleave personalizes the dances, and makes them fun! She is good at breaking down the steps so that we can learn the dances faster.”

Mrs. Gleave said, “It’s always a kick to work with my students whether inside or outside the classroom. If I got the chance to choreograph next year's play, I definitely would! We have an incredibly talented student body and its fun to be a part of the happenings here!”
  

Boys servin' it up at tennis

Attributions: 
Renae Lovelace, SJHS Staff Writer

All seventh through ninth grade boys have the opportunity to participate in boys tennis.  At practice some of the things they do are play matches against each other, run drills, practice different hits and work on consistency. Tanner Garvais, an eighth grader as SJHS, said, “We do conditioning, run, and lots of other stuff, we don’t just play tennis.”

Practices take place outside Springville Junior High at our tennis courts. Practice starts at 2:45 and ends at 4:20. The tennis team plays against other schools too. Mr. Dahl, the tennis coach, said, “we play against all other junior highs in the district, such as Diamond Fork, Mapleton, Payson, Spanish Fork, and Mt. Nebo." The team usually has two games a week and will have matches until the middle of May.

According to Mr. Dahl, he enjoys coaching the team because it’s fun for him to work with the kids in a format other than the classroom. Tennis is something he played when he was young, so he likes being able to pass what he knows “on to younger generations and help them advance in the sport.” Austin Dayton, an eighth-grade student, said, “I signed up for tennis because I enjoy it. It’s fun to hang out and play tennis with the other kids, and it’s just amazing!”

Guest chef visits SJHS

Attributions: 
Joee Lowe, SJHS Staff Writer

Mrs. Luke is mixing it up in the foods room. Students are cooking foreign cuisine and salads. A guest chef visited Mrs. Luke’s eighth and ninth grade food classes on March 21st. Brian Smith, Mrs. Luke’s brother-in-law, came to demonstrate a variety of foods for her students. Katelynn Marshall, ninth-grade student, said, “I liked it when he came.  It was really fun to learn to make all that food and watch him make it.”

Chef Brian Smith has been coming every semester to Mrs. Luke’s food classes for six years now. Mrs. Luke, foods teacher, said, “He comes because he loves to share great recipes and it’s always fun to have people come in and share new techniques and ideas.”

Chef Brian cooked various types of Japanese food: Ma Po tofu, miso (a Japanese soup), Cucumber pickles and Inarizushi (tofu with pork dish) for Mrs. Luke‘s ninth graders. Christie Baugh, another ninth grader, said, “I liked most of what he cooked, it was different and tasty.”

For Mrs. Luke’s eighth graders, Chef Brian cooked some healthy and tasty salads! The salads included cilantro lime coleslaw, Tony’s salad, balsamic vinaigrette, and oriental cabbage salad.

According to Mrs. Luke, Chef Brian LOVES to cook. He’s constantly trying out new recipes, and he is always excited when we plan the day each semester for him to come. Chef Brian will most definitely come back next year.

SJHS elects 2011-12 student council

Attributions: 
Ali Earnshaw, SJHS Staff Writer
SJHS’s new presidents: Stacy Stapel and Jamie Devenish

Student council is more than a few students who are on a committee for school—it’s  leadership. Most people want to run for student council because of the fame that comes along with it, but it’s also about being a good example to others.  Amanda Ripley, an eighth grader at SJHS, said, “I wanted to run for student council because I want the world to be a better place. I can start at SJHS with student council and then work my way to the world.” According to Mr. Knudsen, vice principal at SJHS, student council is an opportunity for students to be leaders. It’s also a chance to be able to hear the voice of the students towards school events.

Election week was from April 4th to the 8th. On Friday the 8th, all candidates showed a video and gave a speech about why students should vote them onto student council. After the assembly, students voted for who they wanted to represent them for next year’s school year. During their ninth-grade year, students on student council will be put into service learning, but their schedule will decide if they are on first semester or second semester student council.

Student council also helps lead the assemblies and will report to Mr. Knudsen with the needs of the school. Jamie Devenish, an eighth grader at SJHS, said, “I wanted to run for student council because it seems like fun and you get more privileges. I wanted to either go big or go home!”  Next year’s student council presidents are Jamie Devenish and Stacy Stapel.  Payton Acor, Lindsay Johnson, Moroni Black, Annee Lange, Amanda Ripley and Ethan Knowlton were elected as next year’s vice presidents.

Book Review: The epic finale of Harry Potter

Attributions: 
Sarah Clark, SJHS Staff Writer

A massive hunt for dark objects and mysterious signs in a book are what await Harry and his two best friends as they conclude their epic story. With Professor Dumbledore gone, they must continue his mission to stop Lord Voldemort, but this is no picnic. Ministry Wizards and Death Eaters have set a ten thousand galleon price on Harry’s head so he and his friends must embark on their journey in secret. Leaving the wizarding world in wonder of what has happened to them, Harry, Ron, and Hermione go on an adventure to end this epic series.

Many of Harry’s most devoted fans are very sad to see the ending of this amazing series. Rebecca Morrison, and eighth-grader, said, “This series was pure genius. Totally amazing!” I have to agree with her. Harry Potter has been a constant presence in libraries across the world. J.K. Rowling has amazing talent in making her readers feel for her characters in a way that when it’s all over they miss them.

The suspense in this book was incredible. You never knew how it was going to end, would good triumph or would evil dominate good? The foreshadowing was so amazing; J.K. Rowling really knew what she was doing. The book was so well written that you could understand what was going on. Nobody can deny that this was a perfect ending to this incredible series.

Harry Potter fans all over the world applauded when they found out that the Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows movie was going to be made in two parts. Before many of them would wonder gloomily about what the directors and producers would edit out in order to make it work, but they perked up when hearing that it was to be made in two parts.

On night of the November 18th, Potter fans all over the U.S.A. waited in long lines or dark hall ways waiting for the moment to finally be here. It was fantastic. No one can deny that this one was the best out of all of the movies. It broke its own records earning, $125.1 million at the box office on opening night. Those people who can say that it was a terrible movie probably didn’t read the book, which is crucial when wanting to see the movie.

I thought that the book was incredible. A perfect way to end the world’s greatest series. I was very sad though when I had finished it, I had nothing to do afterward, so what did I do? I read it again. Amanda Ripley, an eighth-grader at SJHS, has now read this series 37 times, and still enjoys every moment of it.

Even the teachers at SJHS love Harry Potter. Mrs. Luke, the foods teacher at SJHS, said, “The movie was extremely accurate. All of the important details were there.” Mrs. Luke said she likes Harry Potter because it has good morals.

Even though the epic series is going to be over soon, Potter Fans know that Hogwarts and Harry’s world does exist, because the magic isn’t in a building or a movie, the magic is everywhere; in the memories and people we hold dear to us.

In any students are interested in reading this series, the books may be found at any library in the U.S. To all the Potter fans, GO HARRY POTTER!

Students teach, Mr. Shields learns

Attributions: 
Camilla Dunn, SJHS Staff Writer
Mr. Shields grading students' presentations.

On March 21st through March 27th if you walked into Mr. Shields’s classroom you wouldn’t see him up there teaching. You would see his students, and if you looked around the room, you would see him sitting in the back of the room acting like an eighth grader.

As an assignment for fourth term, Mr. Shields’s students had to teach a part of a lesson that they researched and prepared on their own. Mr. Shields said he did this for two reasons. “The first reason is to give the students an opportunity to learn to research and prepare themselves if they ever have to speak in public. The second reason is to put the students in the shoes of their teachers, so they can see what it’s like to teach.” He continued, “I think you learn more if you teach then you do if you listen.”

Chance Farr, an eighth grader in Mr. Shields’s sixth period class, agreed, “This assignment a fun way to learn.” Chance did his lesson on the growth of the cotton industry.  He said, “I didn’t even know there was such a thing.”

Some groups brought food like cotton candy and salsa when they taught. Mr. Shields was pleased with the effort put into most groups, unfortunately not all the students did their best. “Some of the groups did awesome, but some of them could have done better. Teaching isn’t as easy as it looks,” he said.

When everyone finished teaching, Mr. Shields rewarded the students for their hard work with a party. They had a great time with all the drinks, food and games. 

School's almost out!

Attributions: 
Mckenzie Reidhead, SJHS Staff Writer

Summer, the warm weather that everyone loves. On May 26th, school will be out for SJHS. Most people like summer for a time to take a break from school. Mr. Nelson, a history and body conditioning teacher at SJHS, said, “I’m very excited for summer because I love the warmth. This summer I’m moving up to Idaho to work on our cattle ranch with my wife.”  Some people just like to relax during summer. Caden Swendsen, a eighth grader at SJHS, said, “My favorite part of summer is sleeping all day, staying up all night, and parting like its 1999.”

Some fun activities for summer are going to Disneyland, swimming, Lagoon, hanging around with your friends, lemonade stands, Seven Peaks, playing at the park, and more. Teija Rosenberg, an eighth-grader at SJHS, said, “I’m really excited for summer because school’s out, and I can sleep in!”

Eighth graders take NAEP test

Attributions: 
Hollie Coulon, SJHS Staff Writer

NAEP stands for National Assessment Educational Progress. The NAEP test is taken to assess the nation’s educational progress. The test is a booklet like the end-of-year test, but much smaller.

The test takes about ninety minutes; some randomly selected eighth graders completed it on March ninth. There are four sections in the test. Three of the sections have to do with school subjects. The last section is about the student taking the test. Students were given about 25 minutes to complete each section.  The tests had different subjects. So if one person has a science test the person next to them may have a math or reading test.

The students who took the test were pulled out of class around the beginning of second period and out until around the end of third. Some of the teachers like Mrs. Carpenter, eighth grade science teacher, did an easy assignment that the kids could easily make up or an assignment that they didn’t have to do. SJHS takes the test almost every year, but only some of the students take it.

Service learning class helps others

Attributions: 
Anna Bunnell, SJHS Staff Writer

On Monday, March 28th, Mrs. Bird’s service learning class and the student council took a bus up to Salt Lake and made kits at the Humanitarian Center for many different families, countries, or anyone that has gone through a natural disaster recently.

“It was fun!” said Andalyn Hall, an eighth grader at SJHS, “I liked being able to get out of school to do service.”

Service learning and the student council went up to the Humanitarian Center and were given a tour of it and then put to work in making different sorts of kits for people in need of them. There where three different kinds of kits: a newborn kit, school kit, and hygiene kit. Each of these kits where for different needs that people had.

Alex Valenzuela, an eighth grader at SJHS, said, “I liked the Humanitarian Center because I loved getting to serve others and seeing how much it would help. We watched a video, and I got to see what some of the kids go through.  It motivated me to give service.”

Choose Your Own Adventure in Mrs. Rice’s class

Attributions: 
Klade Smith, SJHS Staff Writer

Don’t you wish you could choose how your life went? What kind of person to be, what kind of setting, if you had powers? Well, the students in Mrs. Rice’s eighth-grade class got to do just that. Create Your Own Adventure (CYOA) is a project where the students in Mrs. Rice’s class got to make Power Point stories about books that they read where you get to choose your own adventure. This was done by making many slides and hyperlinking the choices to other articles that have more choices. The students worked on this during the month of March. This is an example of what it looks like:

You are a 12 year old potato farmer that found a strange turquoise potato while farming.

Choices:

Take it home and eat it
Shoot it with your gun
Leave it there
Show it to your friend

When you click one of the choices, it takes you to a new slide:

You have shot the potato with your gun but a strange gas comes from it.

Choices:

Smell the sweet fragrance
Run away
Sell it
Kick it away

And once it’s all done, the story has multiple plot choices. Mrs. Rice had her students do this project, “So we they could experiment with plot.” Some of the students had their stories lead their reader on the path they should choose by making them go back every time they chose the wrong option, while other students wanted the reader to make their own decision on what to do. When asked what novel he created his story after, Ezra Hopoate, an eighth grader at SJHS, said, “I did mine on 39 Clues. I liked how you could switch the book up and make it you.”

Students said that they enjoyed this project and would live to do it again. “There were different plots. You could choose like A, B, C, or D. It was kinda cool,” said Nyck Cantrell, an eighth-grade student at SJHS. Any students who are interested in this should go find a student who participated and see for themselves!

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