December 2011

World War II in an English class?

Attributions: 
Shay Johnson, SJHS Staff Writer

At Springville Junior High School one of our English teachers is Mrs. Elizabeth Bass. In her eighth grade class, Mrs. Bass is teaching her class about World War ll, and will soon be reading the Dairy of Anne Frank. Mrs. Bass thinks that everyone with appreciate learning the history for many reasons.

Jordann Wallentine, and eighth-grader at SJHS, said, “It is very interesting to learn everything about Hitler, and World War ll, there are so many different and cool things we are learning about this topic, And Mrs. Bass is having us do a presentation on one of the many topics with partners.”

Mrs. Bass had her students watch videos of World War ll and taught them about Anne Frank. Mrs. Bass also had her class read articles on the Holocaust. According to Jordann, she thinks that it is really good to learn about this because it is very important to know what Hitler did and learn what happened to Anne Frank and also about World War ll.

Recipe Demonstrations in the Foods Class

Attributions: 
Marynda Chipman, SJHS Staff Writer
Zuki Kaufman, Sam Roper, and Oakley Call show the foods class how to make "astronaut surprise."

The foods class is known for cooking food, but that’s not all they do.  Most Fridays, the eighth and ninth-grade students who are enrolled in the foods exploration class at Springville Junior High School are required to do a demonstration in front of their class.   This is where the students make a food by themselves, or with one helper.  Demonstrating in front of everyone, including the teacher, proves that students have learned how to cook on their own.  The eighth graders can choose any food recipe they would like to make.  The ninth-grade students choose a recipe from a foreign country.  They are also supposed to share ten facts about the country with the class.  The students bring their own ingredients and supplies for their recipe unless the students need things like flour, salt, or sugar, then they are allowed to use the rooms’ supplies as long as they wash the dishes.

Mrs. Harrington, the foods student teacher, said, “It is good for the students watching to learn how to cook something new.  What the students enjoy even more is eating the food the demonstrator prepared for them.”  The students are graded on sanitation, knowing what nutrients are in their recipe, and using correct cooking techniques. They also need to be able to answer questions that students in the audience ask.  According to Kelsie Taylor, an eighth grader, the hardest part about doing her demonstration was making sure everything was ready and that she had all of the ingredients that she needed.

A few of Mrs. Harrington’s favorite foods that have been made by students are salsa by Spencer Allen, a ninth grader, cheese balls by Ben Stewart, an eighth grader, and Korean Pancakes by Sarah Torsak, a ninth grader.  Demonstrations in the foods class help the students learn how to cook better. 

FFA attends leadership conference in Richfield

Attributions: 
Marin Rosenberg, SJHS Staff Writer

The Future Farmers of America (FFA) from Springville Junior High School went to Richfield on Friday December 2nd to attend the Utah Youth Leadership Conference. At the conference they learned about how to be a good leader and how to speak in front of crowds. They learned that someone is always looking up to them. They went to the state fairground, split up into groups, and went to different people to learn about how to be good FFA students. Students in agriculture classes and can sign up to be in the FFA group. The group drove to Richfield and stayed overnight because the conference took two days, and they wouldn’t be able to make it back in time if they drove back to Springville. 

When the group got to the conference, they played a social game because everyone was kind of unfamiliar to each other. After that, the kids had a dance. Alex Venzuela, ninth grade student in the FFA group, said, “I’m pretty much the best dancer ever, and I danced my heart out with all the girls.”  The whole FFA group didn’t have to come to school on that day because the conference was going to last the whole day. The FFA is doing a sub for Santa right now, and in April, they’re going back down to Richfield for another convention. 

The FFA group is a very helpful group to everyone, but you have to be in ninth grade to be in it. Andalyn Hall, ninth grade student and FFA member, said, “We got to learn about how to be a good leader and we heard lots of motivational speeches. I learned a lot of new things and met lots of new people too. I had so much fun!”

 

Mr. Dahl’s Classes Make Cell Models

Attributions: 
Somer Johnson SJHS Staff Writer
Mr. Dahl's students show off their cell models.

On October 24th through November 4th, Mr. Sam Dahl’s seventh-grade science classes at Springville Junior High School made cell models.  Students had about three weeks to make a cell out of whatever material they could.  Mr. Dahl said, “Many students used styrofoam spheres and modeling clay to build their cells.  Some used food products.  I had one student make a big sugar cookie with different types of candy to represent the parts of the cells.”  

Serina Mumford, seventh grader in Mr. Dahl’s science class, said “I got to think and figure out what to do with my cell.” According to Mr. Dahl, students should have learned the parts of the cell and what the functions of the parts are. 

Spotlight: Mrs. Hunsaker

Attributions: 
Allyson Smith, SJHS Staff Writer
Mrs. Amanda Hunsaker

Ever since Mrs. Amanda Hunsaker, was a little kid, she wanted to either be a history teacher, because she loves history, or a nurse, because her mom and sister are both nurses so she wanted to be one. But when Mrs. Hunsaker went to college, she did a summer camp for students in Special Education. She fell in love with it. So now, Mrs. Hunsaker teaches Special Education at Springville Junior High school. Mrs. Hunsaker said, “I never thought that I would ever teach this, but I just fell in love with it when I was in college doing the summer camp.”

Mrs. Hunsaker loves to see her students learn and progress. She really likes to see the students master difficult things. 

Peer tutors also help out in Mrs. Hunsaker’ class. Mrs. Hunsaker said, “They are AMAZING! They are the most important. Lots of the students need individual help.” So, the peer tutors will go and help the students with their math or their reading. Sometimes the peer tutors will help one or two students at a time.

Mrs. Hunsaker really enjoys teaching her class. She said, “I love teaching at the junior high, because there are so many things to teach and so many things to do. It’s fun to be able to do all the things I do.”

Spotlight on Mrs. Nilsson

Attributions: 
Sarah Skinner, SJHS Staff Writer
Mrs. Angel Nilsson

Mrs. Angel Nilsson is one of the new teachers here at Springville Junior High. She teaches pre-algebra all day, and she loves it! Mrs. Nilsson loves seeing her students reaction when they understand the math that she is teaching them. 

Mrs. Nilsson went to Brigham Young University to get her mathematics education. Mrs. Nilsson said, “I never thought I would end up as a teacher, but when I got to college and started studying math, I realized that teaching would actually be ideal for me.”

Zoe Dalley, a seventh-grade student at SJHS, said, “Mrs. Nilsson makes math as fun as math can be.” Brent Williams, a seventh grade student at SJHS, said, “She really helps me with my math and makes things less boring.” 

Mrs. Nilsson grew up in Dutch John, Utah, a tiny little town in the Flaming Gorge recreation area. Her junior high and high school were an hour away, across the mountain in Manila, Utah. Her graduating class was only 13 people! 

Mrs. Nilsson said, “When I'm not spending time with family, I fill my time with lots of hobbies like eating, watching movies, sewing, etc. Also, my husband and I love riding his motorcycle and going to rock concerts!”

Mrs. Nilsson is really enjoying her time at Springville Junior High.  She said, “I love teaching at SJHS! The students are fun and bright. Even though I am new to the school, I already have a lot of school pride. We have the toughest and most honorable mascot and a great student body to go along. Go knights!” 

Spotlight: Mrs. Persson

Attributions: 
Somer Johnson SJHS Staff Writer
Mrs. Erica Persson

Springville Junior High has a new teacher named Mrs. Erica Persson; she teaches dance, health 8, and aerobics.  Mrs.  Persson has wanted to be a teacher since she was a little girl.  Mrs. Persson said, “I really enjoyed helping people and found teaching was fun.” Mrs. Persson’s favorite part about teaching is “The ‘Ah Ha’ moments, that is when the light comes on and I know the student understands what is being taught.”

In her free time, Mrs. Persson spends time with her husband and kids.  When she isn’t with her family she likes to sing, play the piano, and read.  Mrs. Persson also trys to do seasonal sports.  J.J. Walentine, an eighth grader in Mrs. Persson’s health class, said, “Mrs. Persson helps you understand yourself.”

SJHS Has A Culture Assembly

Attributions: 
Marynda Chipman, SJHS Staff Writer
SJHS students who performed the Aztec dance: top row, left to right: Abby Espinoza, Jasmin Valdivia, Paula Jiminez, Selena, Kassandra Perez, Dominic Edwards, Yaira Espinoza, Kiara Triejo, and Jessica Lopez. Bottom: Magaly Vasquez and Pamela Lopez.

On November 22, 2011, Springville Junior High School had a culture assembly where students were able to sing, dance, or play their instruments in front of the school.  The students began practicing in September for two or three times per week.  The theme of the assembly was “Diversity Means.”  Mr. David Hansen, a history teacher at SJHS, said, “We wanted the students to show their different cultures and talents.”

Jentry Hendricks, an eighth-grade girl, was one of three girls in a singing performance.  The other two girls in the group were Ciara Snapp, and Demmi Nava, who are both eighth graders.  They sang a song called ‘Liar Liar’ by Christina Grimmie.  One of Jentry’s favorite performances was the Aztec dance.

Most of the students who participated in the dances did not know the steps already.  They were taught by Jessica Lopez, a ninth grader, Demmi Nava and Kiera Trejio, both eighth graders.

Mr. Hansen thought it was a good idea for an assembly because it’s good to celebrate diversity.  Mr. Booth, the SJHS band teacher, said, “The theme of the assembly was great.  It was very cool to see a wide variety of performances and cultures.”  According to Mr. Hansen, all of the performances were good in their own way and they were all unique.  Mr. Hansen loved the assembly most because he was able to see the students grow so much.  One of the performances was a piano piece performed by Chase Kimball, an eighth grader.  Mr. Hansen said, “We asked Chase to do it because we knew he could.  He’s incredible, just incredible.”

Another performance was Dominic Edwards.  She sang her heart out and blew everyone away.  According to Mr. Hansen, she knocked it out.  There were also Samoan dances, the band, and the fiddle band, with Sam Hall, an eighth grader, as a dancer.  It’s clear that the culture assembly was a big hit at Springville Junior High School.

The Amazing, Fun Choir Tour

Attributions: 
Allyson Smith, SJHS Staff Writer

The Springville Junior High School choir Mastersingers (ninth grade boys and girls), Knightingales (eighth grade girls), and Journeymen (eighth grade boys), went to five different elementary schools in Nebo School District and sang Christmas songs on December 2nd.  Sarah Skinner, an eighth grader, said, “It was so fun. I would love doing it again, because we got to hang out with our choirmates and sing to all of the little people.” Everyone had a fantastic time.

The choir went to the mall after three schools and had lunch. After they had lunch they went to two more schools. An eighth grader, Jackson Stewart, said, “I would really like to go on the tour again. You get to go with your friends and have a good time.”  Delanie Mortensen, another eighth grader, said, “I liked watching  the kids’ reactions when Mrs. Walker would say that we will be turning the lights off for a song, or when we sang Silent Night and they would be singing with us. They all gasped and got excited.”

Quest Time's Fiddling Fiddle Band

Attributions: 
Sam Hall, SJHS Staff Writer

Quest Time is the period when students can have fun if they have good grades, or catch up in a class if they are behind or have a deficient grade. Dr. Samuel Tsugawa, orchestra teacher at Springville Junior High School, has started an activity back up during Quest Time.  Dr. Tsugawa’s activity is called the Quest Time Blue Grass Fiddle Band, but some students like to call it Fiddle Band.

During Fiddle Band, students learn how to play songs by ear without music books. They are learning “Cripple Creek,” “Old Joe Clark,” and “Bonnie James Campbell.” Kenya Rodriguez, an eighth grader at SJHS, said, "I think fiddle band should use books only if we need to learn a song very quickly, but other than that I think we should learn by just using our hearing abilities." Members of the fiddle band may also learn how to play a new instrument rather than the instrument the students already play in orchestra. Students also have the option of playing their own instrument. 

Many of the students in Fiddle Band decided to try it because they get to hang with friends, learn new songs, techniques, and play new instruments if they like. In Fiddle Band they sometimes play at concerts with the orchestra classes. Joseph Cieslewicz, an eighth grader, said, "I like blue grass music and my friends go to it." So, if Quest Time Blue Grass Fiddle Band in the orchestra room sounds like fun, come and try fiddling around with the band.

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