January 2012

FFA Competition

Caitlin Dinkel

Springville FFA members recently competed in an FFA Area Contest in order to prepare for the state competition in March.  SJHS ninth grader Caitlin Dinkel came in first place in the Creed Speaking Contest.

Welcome Ms. Cottle!

Attributions: 
Demmi Nava, SJHS Staff Writer
Ms. Amanda Cottle, administrative intern at SJHS

Springville Junior High School would like to welcome Ms. Amanda Cottle to the SJHS administration! Ms. Cottle received her undergraduate degree from Arizona State University, and is currently working her Master’s degree at Brigham Young University. Before Ms. Cottle became an administrative intern she taught sixth grade in Mesa, Arizona for seven years and third grade for one year. Ms. Cottle started the school year as an assistant principal at Hobble Creek Elementary school in Mapleton, and is now working with us, here at SJHS.

Mr. Trent Mikesell, the student services administrator at SJHS, said “She’s great to work with. She’s very organized and professional and easy to get along with.” According to Mr. Mikesell, students should get to know Ms. Cottle. Ms. Cottle said, “I wanted to become an assistant principal because I love working with students and helping them succeed.  I enjoy being able to work with so many students in all the different grades.” Of all the schools Ms. Cottle could have chosen she chose SJHS because she wanted to see what things are like at a junior high and enjoys working with students around our age. 

Mr. Mikesell also said, “We are glad to have Ms. Cottle here at SJHS. She will be a great help to the administration, staff and to the faculty and students. ”

The most popular sport at SJHS

Attributions: 
Chase Kimball, SJHS Staff Writer

According to Mrs. Kelly Anderson, girls P.E. teacher at Springville Junior High, badminton is one of the most popular sports among students at SJHS, which is why she holds a badminton Enrichment class every Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday during Quest Time. Badminton goes on as long as the nets are up for the different sports they play in girls P.E.

Mrs. Anderson said, “More kids come for badminton than for any other sport.” The students rotate courts about every eight to ten minutes, and play four to five games every Quest Time period. 

Peggy Sorenson, a ninth grader at SJHS, loves badminton and comes as often as she can to Mrs. Anderson’s badminton class. Peggy said, “It’s kind of like tennis, but it’s with a little birdie.”

Once the girls P.E. classes start playing outdoor sports, there are board games in the girl’s gym during Quest Time.

Agriculture Class Visits Local Farm

Attributions: 
Sam Hall, SJHS Staff Writer
Mrs. Giffing and the SJHS Agriculture Science class visited the Halls' farm in Springville.
Mr. Dave Knudsen, assistant principal at SJHS, feeding an alpaca at the Halls' farm.
Mr. Mikesell, student services administrator, with the Halls' reindeer.

On Tuesday November 20th, the students of the Agriculture Science class went to ninth-grade student Andalyn Hall’s farm. Mrs. Hall, Andalyn Hall's mom, said, “The FFA class came to our farm to help Andalyn, my daughter, and a student in the Agriculture Science Class with her science project. 

Caitlin Dinkel said, “I had fun on the field trip, and we learned the best way to shave an alpaca.” Although they did not shave the whole alpaca, they learned the correct way to catch and shave the alpacas.  

According to Mrs. Monica Giffing, the Agriculture Science teacher, Andalyn needed help collecting  fiber samples from three  alpacas. The agriculture class helped by catching them and holding them while Andalyn shaved off some fibers (hair).  The samples were then placed in plastic bags identifying which alpaca they came from. With these samples Andalyn will be comparing the strength of the fibers based on the age of the alpacas. 

The class was also able to tour the Hall Farm and see a variety of animals.  The Halls have one of the largest collections of exotic water fowl in Utah, a kangaroo, a reindeer, and an Asian pig.  The Hall family was very kind to allow the agriculture class to visit their farm. If this sounds fun to you, then you should join the Agriculture Science class and learn, as Mrs. Giffing says, “How to wrestle an alpaca.”

SJHS Students Sing Math Carols

Attributions: 
Allyson Smith, SJHS Staff Writer
Mrs. Gleave's geometry class singing math carols.

One week before Christmas break, Mrs. Corrin Gleave’s math classes sang math Christmas carols to several different classes at Springville Junior High School.

Mrs. Gleave taught a caroling unit which took three days. On day one the students seperated into small groups and picked familar Christmas carols, and replaced the lyrics with original math formulas and processes.  On day two they practiced the carols, and on day three they went caroling. Mrs. Gleave said, “Learning information to a familiar tune is a great way to memorize that information. Math formulas can be tricky to remember, so this is a fun way to learn a valuable skill.” Mrs. Gleave has her classes sing carols so that they can have a fun way of learning math formulas.                                                                          

Mrs. Gleave also said, “I think it absolutely boosts students’ spirit at the holidays. It’s fun to see how many students sing the formula carols all week long, some students are still singing them in January when we return to from winter break.”

Eighth graders Alexandria Sorenson, Katie Ashton, and Wyatt LeFevre agreed and said, “It’s a tradition.  It helps us memorize formulas, and it is entertaining.”

According to some geometry students, they felt that it was a big help when the students picked a song, a formula, and put it together. It helped them remember the formulas, with a fun twist. Wyatt LeFevre, said, “It was fun because we were privileged to go about enriching fellow students with our math knowledge through song.” 

Students Participate in 4H Clubs at SJHS

Attributions: 
Ali Earnshaw, SJHS Staff Writer

According to Mr. Ken Van Ausdal, principal at Springville Junior High School, the 4H clubs gives students opportunities to develop talents and discover new ones. It also gives students a chance to be more involved in school activities and become more a part of the school. 

Recently SJHS changed the extracurricular 4H activities. On Mondays, the beauty/self-improvement and pilaties/yoga clubs meet. On Tuesdays, the French, crocheting, and mock trial clubs meet. On Wednesdays, the scrapbookin and zumba clubs meet. On Thursdays, the board games and mock trial clubs meet.  And lastly, on Fridays the cheerleading club meets.  According to Ms. Justine Kent, the 4H coordinator, in order to participate in 4H clubs, students must pay five dollars to the finance office which goes directly to the school for 4H activities or for other school needs; students do not have to maintain a certain GPA to be involved in 4H clubs. 

Students meet at 2:45 in the cafeteria for 4H clubs. They work on homework and eat snacks. Also during that time, the students play games, say our nation’s pledge and the 4H pledge. At 3:15 students are dismissed to participate in their assigned clubs.

Ms. Kent also said, “The main focus of after school clubs is to help students have some place to go after school hours. We are here to help them learn new talents, and make new friends.” 

Madison Johnson, seventh grader at SJHS who attends the beauty and self-improvement club, said, “The 4H clubs are worth the time of participating in because it’s fun, and my club in particular teaches you not to bully yourself. We also get to have fun activities like painting our nails and doing our hair and make-up.”

The Seventh Grade Pod Takes a Field Trip to BYU

Attributions: 
Claire Davis, SJHS staff writer
Seventh-grade girls in front of the elephant in the Bean Museum at BYU. Left to right: Shelby Tedrow, Lela Packard, Alyssa Bird, Cheyanne Brown, Brooke Critchfield, Tyree Strong, and Windsor McRae.
Tanner Johstoneaux, Craig Riding, Jacob Esperanza, and Rachel Laredo meet the Bean Museum's bull python snake.

On December 4, 2011, the seventh grade pod took a field trip to several different places on Brigham Young University campus in Provo.  “We wanted students to understand the real world application to some of the things they were learning in math and science,” said Ms. Rachel Neeley, a seventh-grade pod English teacher. 

According to Ms. Tiffanie Miley, a seventh-grade pod English teacher, on the field trip they went to a math presentation, done by the math professor at BYU, Dr. Michael Dorff. At the presentation, Dr. Dorff taught the students about math, and how it connects to their lives. He showed the students some of the research he has done with soap bubbles.  “He made the bubbles go into different shapes,” said Joshua Ripley, a seventh grader who went on the field trip. “He also showed the students some math games and code breaking,” said Mrs. Angel Nilsson, the math teacher for the pod. The students also went to the Bean Museum, where they learned more about animal adaptions, which is what the seventh graders had just learned about in their science class. While they were at this presentation, they had the chance to pet an albino frog, a bull python snake, and several different types of animal fur.

Overall, the students enjoyed the field trip and they learned new things on the field trip as well as in the classroom.

Spotlight: Mr. Booth

Attributions: 
Chase Kimball, SJHS Staff Writer
Mr. Booth, band teacher at SJHS

Mr. Booth loves music. It’s a fact. In high school Mr. Booth played the trumpet, baritone and valve trombone, and later learned to play the flute, clarinet, and the drum set and can half- play several other instruments. According to Mr. Booth, his high school wrestling coach, Mr. Hilderman, inspired him to become a teacher. Mr. Booth went to school at Eastern New Mexico University, BYU, and Rick’s College. He decided to become a band teacher halfway through college. Mr. Booth was in a band called the Desotos for several years, where he sang and played the drums. The band performed all over Utah and some in Nevada.

Mr. Booth enjoys being at SJHS. He said “I love my job! I really enjoy teaching music and geography and working with awesome students! I’m very grateful to teach at Springville Junior High and wouldn’t want to teach anywhere else.” Mr. Booth enjoys working in his yard, spending time with family, and baking cookies.

According to Chris Fitzgerald, Mr. Booth is an excellent teacher. He said, “I like his amazing stories and his sense of humor.”  According to Chris, Mr. Booth makes the classes he teaches enjoyable, and the students he teaches are willing to learn yet still have fun.

History classes learn about the Declaration of Independence

Attributions: 
Maria Peralta, SJHS Staff Writer

The history classes at Springville Junior High School are learning about the Declaration of Independence. Mr. Shields, history teacher, is teaching the students about how the colonists in America wanted to be free from the British government.   

Mr. Shields said, “I love teaching about the Declaration of Independence. It is such an important document, and sadly many Americans don’t even know what it is, let alone what it says.”  The Declaration of Independence is important for students to learn about so they can know about the wars that happened and why they happened. How many different strategies that the Americans and French used against the British to declare their freedom.   

Jordann Wallentine, an eight-grade student, said, “I love learning about it, it’s actually really interesting and Mr. Shields makes it fun to learn about too. The colonist in America wanted to be free of British government, and wrote document declaring their freedom that caused a huge war against Britain.” 

CTE classes switch things up

Attributions: 
Emma Johnson, SJHS Staff Writer

Recently, the CTE Introduction classes at Springville Junior High switched thing up a bit.  CTE is a year-long course that teaches business, family and consumer science, and technology.   Every trimester (one third of the year or 12 weeks) the seventh-grade students are transferred from class to class so they can learn each subject.  

There are three main areas to be covered and each teacher is trained and has a college degree in what they teach.  Madison Johnson, a seventh-grade student, said, “I like not being in the same class all year and being able to move around.” Mrs. Hales teaches Business, Mrs. Bird teaches Family and Consumer Science and Mr. Rencher  teaches Technology and Engineering.  All 3 teachers also cover Marketing, Economics, Agriculture and Information Technology.  

Mrs. Hales said, “Getting new students every 60 days is really fun.  I like getting the chance to meet the whole seventh-grade class.” She also thinks the students like getting a new teacher and changing things up. According to Mr. Rencher, some students like the change, some don’t.  Each student usually finds one of the three areas they identify with more than the other.

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