September 2012

What in the World is Quest Time?

Attributions: 
Sadie Clark, SJHS Staff Writer
Students play card games in Ms. Miley’s game room during Quest Time. Clockwise from left: Ben Leishman, Sammy Gutierrez, Savannah Simmons, Tessa Larson, Alivia Woolsey, Abi Maccabee, and Abbi Morris.

Quest Time is a small, 20 minute period where the many students, teachers, and administrators at Springville Junior High School can have a little fun, or where other students can get some extra help. Mr. Mikesell, the Dean of Students, said, “The biggest goal is to help students understand concepts that they may have missed in class or didn't understand.” 

Quest Time is in between 3rd and 4th period everyday. (Except Wednesday because it’s early out day.) Each student receives a slip with his/her grades printed out. Those students with deficiencies ( D’s, F’s, or I’s) are required to go to intervention. Intervention is where the teachers have their classrooms open to students to help make up work, take tests, or just to get some extra help.

Those students with A’s, B’s, and C’s are allowed to attendent an enrichment activity of their choice. Some fun activities include: movie room, conversation room, game room, karaoke, sewing club, and game room. Although these activities seem fun, those students can also choose go to writing labs, the library, or homework labs. Some students prefer this so they don’t have to do their homework at home when they have time to do it at school.

The majority of this program works really well and is extremely helpful. “Quest Time is as perfect as the teachers and students who follow the guidelines and rules of the program.  For the most part, it works really well and helps students, but there are some kinks that need working out,” said Mrs. Bass, an English teacher. According to Spencer Gwilliam, he likes it because it gives him a chance to do better. “You can hang out with friends and relax,” said Lauren Biesinger, an eighth-grade student. The students and teachers at SJHS really appreciate this program and enjoy its many advantages.

Cross Country at SJHS

Attributions: 
Abi Maccabee, SJHS Staff Writer
Girls had just started their race against Spanish Fork Junior High and Diamond Fork Junior High at SJHS on Friday, September 21.

Cross country is not just an after school activity. It’s a great way to get fit, and have fun. The season for cross country is throughout the fall, and it is for anyone in the grades seven through and nine. The team practices every day after school for about an hour and a half.

Many members of the cross country team have agreed that they enjoy cross country, and that it is a great opportunity to get out in the fresh air and run. Nathan Merrill, an eighth-grader at SJHS, said, “It’s very painful, but it’s worth it.” Most team members enjoy that sometimes after practice, they chill and eat otter pops, or play ultimate Frisbee.

Every Friday for eight weeks, there are competitions. They happen at various schools in the Nebo School District. Runners get to choose if they would like to participate in the competitions or not. Participants run a full mile and a half. A lot of the members on the SJHS team do go to competitions. Julie Sumsion, an eighth-grader at SJHS, took first in a recent competition. She said, “I was nervous at first, but once you start, you just go for it.” Keaton Draper, a ninth grader at SJHS, also did well. He took second place at a recent competition. 

Cross country is a wonderful sport that the junior high offers. Students like to participate, and get out and run. Keaton Draper said, “I like to set goals, and achieve them.” We wish the SJHS cross country team luck.

The Yearbook Staff Learns Responsibility and Creativity

Attributions: 
Ceci Sumsion, SJHS Writer Staff
The 2012-13 SJHS yearbook staff.

Some of you may not know this, but your fellow students are already hard at work making this year's yearbook.  A staff of 12 students was selected to be in the yearbook class. They are going to be working all year long on the SJHS yearbook. They put things in it like Quest Time, dances, school sports, and highlights of the year.  This class takes place seventh period in Ms. Neeley’s classroom.

Ms. Neeley, the yearbook advisor, said ,“I hope my students learn to be responsible, creative and learn how to design.” Also, according to Ms.Neeley, SJHS students should buy a yearbook, because it will be fun to look at all the memories you had in junior high.  

Making the yearbook is a process that takes up most of the year. During the year, the yearbook staff do many different things to get the yearbook ready.  First, they have to brainstorm. Then they have to decide the theme, the colors of the book and how they plan to carry out the theme on the book. Then they assign pages, the pages are what they work on throughout the year. 

Emily Bird, a eighth-grader in yearbook, said that she likes yearbook because she gets to release her inner creativity. Students on the yearbook staff also love that they get to take pictures.  

9th Graders on the Red Devil High School Tennis Team

Attributions: 
Allyson Smith, SJHS Staff Writer
The SHS Tennis Team. The ninth graders from SJHS are: Stephanie Aragon, Maddie Brenchley, Sarah Skinner, and Allyson Smith.

At  Springville High School there is a girls tennis team. Four of Springville Junior High School ninth graders that are on the team. The ninth graders are Sarah Skinner, Stephanie Aragon, Maddy Brenchley, and Allyson Smith.

At the beginning of the season, the team competed in ladder competitions. The way it works is that each girl is rated on how well they play or by their skill level. Depending on where they’re at on the ladder, the team member plays against someone who is one place above them. If the lower player wins, she moves up, and if the upper player wins, then they stay in the same place until they have another chance to move up again. This way the players are ranked but they have a chance to move up over the course of the season.

There are 25 girls on the tennis team. Most other teams have 15-20 girls on their team. So when the SHS team play ladder competitions, they really work hard so they can move up to be at the top of the ladder. Michael Flood, coach of Springville High School tennis team, said, “Every one of the girls on the tennis team have definitely improved particularly in their serving, drop shots and net play.”        

Sarah Skinner, a ninth grader on the High School tennis team, said, “I’m happy I made the team. I’m learning a lot and I’m improving my skill.” According to Sarah, it’s a lot more “competition,” and it’s hard, but it’s fun and enjoyable. “I know I’m getting better.”

According to coach Flood, he’s always enjoyed the game of tennis since junior high. “In my later years of life, tennis had become the most frequently coached sport for me. The team responds quite well to me as a coach. I have been able to help advance their tennis skills. The team has come a long way in their development and it was their personal drive to be better that has helped our team become better each week,” he said.

The team has held fundraisers to help make money for the team so they can buy new equipment, or shirts to represent the team. On September eighth and the fifteenth, the team had a clinic to teach eight-fourteen year olds how to play tennis. According to Sarah Skinner, it was a huge success. They raised $250 and  were able to buy tennis shirts for the whole team.

Taking the Journey with the Eighth-Grade Boys Choir

Attributions: 
Zoe Dalley, SJHS Staff Writer

Springville Junior High School has a special singing program made specifically for eighth-grade boys. It’s called the Journeymen, and it is revolutionizing how boys learn to sing. It’s a boys-only class, which eases the transition for boys and their changing voices. This class is held at Springville Junior High School, is one semester long, and is taught by our fabulous choir teacher Mrs.Walker.

The boys-only nature of this class is necessary because junior high is a very awkward time for boys and their singing voices. According to Mrs.Walker, choir teacher at SJHS, this is the main time when their singing starts to change. The same goes for girls, who also have their own separate choir class, which makes it so the separate genders can't judge or make fun of eachother. Mrs. Walker also decided to split up the classes because more students are participating in this grade, and one class would be much too big.

It's easy to tell that the Journeymen have had a positive influence on the school because it is well liked by everyone who participates. “I like it al ot!” said student Ben Leishman. According to him, it’s just a fun way for all of the guys to get together and sing. “I love their energy and enthusiasm!” said Mrs. Walker, “There’s nothing as energetic and fun as a group of boys!” All the boys in the class think it is a lot of fun, and that it is something to look forward to.

Seventh-grade boys are strongly urged by current members to join the Journeymen next year. According to Journeyman member Ben Leishman, the class is a great opportunity to learn how to sing, and it’s great to be able to sing with boys only. Mrs.Walker feels that the boys learn better without the eighth-grade girls. “We have such a great group of seventh-grade boys this year, I will absolutely recommend this class to them,” she said. In Journeymen, boys will be learning how to sing in tune, how to sing with energy and expression, and how to perform in front of people--great skills to learn if you are planning on a career in any type of music. “Do it, just do it,” said SJHS student and Journeyman Spencer Johnson. So, in conclusion, the Journeymen choir is a great way for young boys to learn and to perform. Get ready to sign up!

9th Grade Cheerleaders Cheer Their Hearts Out

Attributions: 
Caitlin Fulkerson, SJHS Staff Writer

Most people think that the life of a cheerleader is easy. The ninth grade cheerleaders at Springville Junior High practice 24/7. So how do they do it all? Well listen up and I will explain how they do it all.

 The cheerleaders have to practice a lot to get all the routines right. According to Jacqueline Bradford, ninth-grade cheerleader, this may take some girls two days, but for others it might take two weeks. “It all depends on the person,” Jacqueline said. So if students started cheering in seventh grade, the routines might be easier for the students when they hit ninth grade because they are all the same. Most girls on the cheer team practice for one hour and 30 minutes every day so they get the routines perfect.

“I signed up for cheer because it was the last year before it got all technical,” Danica Pace, another ninth-grade cheerleader, said. According to Colbi Casper, ninth-grade cheerleader, cheer is a good activity for hanging out with your friends and having a good time. Also, some of them signed up because they were interested in the sport. Everybody on the cheer team seems to enjoy it. So, if students seem interested in cheering at football games, hanging out with friends, and having fun, they too could sign up for cheer.

Girls' Sophomore Volleyball Team

Attributions: 
Marynda Chipman, SJHS Staff Writer
Katie Johnson, a member of the sophomore volleyball team.

This year at Springville High School, the girl’s sophomore volleyball team has been doing very well.  Since there is not a freshmen volleyball team, the sophomore team is mostly made up of freshmen girls.  So far, their record is three wins and one loss.  The sophomore team’s coach, Kristin Clark, said, “Thus far I have LOVED this season! I've been working with these girls since April and being able to see their progress makes everything worth it. Their continual hard work and love of the game makes coaching so enjoyable.” 

According to Katie Johnson, a ninth grader at Springville Junior High School, the best part of being on the volleyball team is the practices, because the team learns new things every time so their playing can improve.  Cassidy Bowers, a ninth-grade student at SJHS, said, “I feel that our volleyball team is doing quite fantastic.  We are doing well in our games.”

According to their coach, the sophomore team’s future looks very bright, and if they keep playing the way they are now, the team will be able to win first place in region.  Go Devils!

Ninth Graders Play on the SHS Soccer Team

Attributions: 
Marin Rosenberg, SJHS Staff Writer

At Springville Junior High, there are some ninth-grade girls that are talented enough to play on the Springville High School soccer team.There’s the varsity soccer team, and  the junior varsity soccer team. The varsity team is made up of mostly high school girls. (sophomores, juniors, and seniors) But the junior varsity team has ninth-grade girls from Springville Junior High school that help make up the team. They have away games every Tuesday and home games every Thursday. The girls have practices  on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays. Lots of the girls really enjoy playing on the high school team, and they try really hard to get better at soccer. 

Janessa Lewis, ninth grader at SJHS, said, “The girls are nice to everyone and the bus rides are really fun.” The majority of the junior varsity team is made up of ninth- graders, and the team has worked together well and won most of their games. Alyssa Oman, ninth grader at SJHS, said, “It’s really different from anything else. It’s a lot of work and practices are two hours long and our coach, Mike Shultske, pushes us and makes sure that we try our hardest.” 

 Lots of the girls on the team really enjoy playing on the soccer team. Maddie Taylor, a ninth grader at SJHS, said, “I do it because it’s really fun and you feel good after scoring a goal  or mastering a really cool move. I also do it because it’s really good exercise and it makes me feel refreshed.”

The coach also gives the JV girls rewards for working really hard. If the girls give 100 percent, then they get to play on the varsity team for a week.

The Joy of Master Singers

Attributions: 
Bailey Patterson, SJHS Staff Writer
Mrs. Walker's ninth-grade Master Singers.

We all know that ninth graders have a little song in them. Well, Springville Junior High has a choir class just for the ninth graders who have the talent to be what are called a Master Singers. Of course, students would have to be in the ninth grade to join them. What they do is go to Mrs. Walker in the spring and try out by singing her a song.Then she will choose if you can be in the Master Singers class, which is all year long.                

Garrett Carr, a ninth-grade Master Singer, said, “It is easy for boys to be in the Master Singers class because all they have to do is carry a tune.” 

The Master Singers get to perform a whole lot for the school and for family. The Candlelight Concert is a tradition that they do every year and dedicate it to a couple of people who have been of service to the community. Plus, they get to go on tour with the Journeymen and the Knightingales. They go to different elementary schools around Springville, and then go out to the Provo Towne Centre Mall, with the other singers.  

This years Master Singers say its way fun to sing in  choir with Mrs. Walker.  They also said that it’s a great way to start their singing techniques. Megan Billings, a ninth-grade Master Singer, said, “Its a great way to learn how to sing... it’s pretty easy.”

Of course, Mrs. Walker will always welcome her students into the classroom to sing along with all the great songs they are learning.        

Seventh and Eighth Grade Cheer has Started!

Attributions: 
Tiana Spencer, SJHS Staff Writer

Seventh and eighth-grade cheer has started! Earlier this year at Springville Junior High, seventh and eighth-grade students paid and signed up to do cheer. It is a recreational sport that the city does for girls in grades six through nine. The city puts each girl that signed up on a football team that they will cheer for. This year there are two teams for seventh, and two for eighth. The amount of teams depends on how many girls sign up. So if there are two football teams, but only enough girls for one, only one team gets cheerleaders. The names  for the seventh-grade teams are the S.O.S Bears and the Rotary Mustangs. The names for the eighth-grade teams are Reams Badgers, Quality Cleaners, and the Vikings. Cheer is a great opportunity for girls to practice cheering before they reach high school and have to try out. Cheer starts when seventh and eighth grade football does in August.

Cheer is a wonderful experience sport that girls should sign up for. Chloe Wimmer a seventh-grade cheerleader said, “Doing cheer, I've made more friends, and have gotten more flexible.” Cheer comes with lots of benefits. You get to have fun, make new friends, get flexible, and gain some new talent. Amanda Smith, an eighth-grade cheerleader, said, “I signed up for cheer because I get to gain experience for high school cheer, and got to practice my back handsprings.” Even cheer can help you get better with some of the talents that you already have.

Like every other sport it comes with its pros and cons. Serina Johnson, another eighth-grade cheerleader, said, “The hard thing about cheer is how many days, and how long we have to to practice. Our team practices for an hour and a half to two hours.” Yes, cheer can be hard for different people like that, but at least you're practicing to get better.  Amanda Smith, another eighth grade cheerleader, said, “I don’t like having to practice and cheer when it’s hot outside.” Although cheer has it’s cons it also has its pros! Sarah Barker, a seventh-grade cheerleader, said, “This year my team has been really nice, and by doing cheers my arms are stronger.” Who wouldn't want to get stronger? Courtney Devenish, a seventh grade cheerleader, said that she's proud of “knowing almost all of the cheers.”  Altogether cheer is a fun, sport for girls to sign up for and do.