Learning about Life in CTE

Attributions: 
Cody Woolsey, SJHS Staff Writer
Mrs. Woodfield helps Ezra Hopoate cuts fabric for his beanbag.

The CTE classes at Springville Junior High School are probably among some of the most enjoyable classes offered. Seventh graders certainly enjoy their CTE classes and look forward to them during the day.

The classes of CTE change around every 60 days, rather than on the semester. Students get the opportunity to do the three segments of CTE: Home Economics, Technology, and Careers. In CTE, students learn things about the world, about their home and raising children, and how to get a good career.

According to seventh-grader Stacy Stapel, her favorite part about CTE is that they get opportunities to do hands on activities. It gives students an opportunity to learn how to do real life things to help them lead a better life in the future.

“I’m excited to learn about new things!” said Hannah Bressler, a seventh grader at Springville Junior High. And who wouldn’t be? The whole class is about things that will help you lead a better life.
 

Learning Chinese at SJHS

Attributions: 
Andrew Garza, SJHS Staff Writer

Chinese is a class that has been at SJHS for three years. There are two Chinese classes; one is called “Intro to Chinese,” which is for eighth graders, and the other is a regular Chinese class for the ninth graders.  Mrs. Debra Wells, the Chinese teacher at SJHS, said that “Intro to Chinese” is only one semester and it focuses on learning to communicate in Chinese. But the ninth grade class is a full year long, and covers communicating orally in Chinese and requires the students to learn about 150 Chinese characters by the end of the year. Both classes cover cultural elements of the Chinese language and Chinese speaking countries in the world. Mrs. Wells said, “We already learned about Chinese Valentine’s Day and next week we will celebrate the Mid-Autmn festival.”

Mrs. Wells also said that by the end of this semester, eighth grade students will be able to hold basic conversations in Chinese, introduce themselves, and talk about their families and things they like to do. By the end of the ninth grade course, students will be able to talk about their families, school, sports, occupations and food all in Chinese. They will also be able to write basic notes in Chinese and read letters from their pen pals.

In Mrs. Wells's class, students play a lot of games to help review vocabulary and learn new sentence patterns. The classes are divided into teams named after cites in China. Mrs. Wells said, “Each day the teams complete a different 'challenge' and the top teams at the end of two weeks will be the grand prize winners.”

Mrs. Wells said, “I first studied Chinese over 30 years ago, and I loved it so much I kept studying I have traveled to Asia for Chinese classes for the last three summers, since I became a public school teacher, and I intend to keep on studying and learning. Whenever I tell someone I'm a teacher, they just nod their heads but if I say 'I teach Chinese,' they are amazed and want to know more. So, if you really want to impress your friends, learn Chinese!”

Radley Nelson, a student at SJHS, said, “I think it’s very interesting to know about other cultures.” He also says that this will help him if he ever goes to China or meets a Chinese person. Vicky Ha, a student at SJHS that was born in Mainland China said, “I like Chinese class because we play a lot of games and the teacher is very nice."

Performing Band At Springville Junior High

Attributions: 
Jose Martinez, SJHS Staff Writer
Mr. Booth conducting the eigth grade band.

Everyone knows that in junior high and in high school there is a Orchestra class, cheerleading, workout, and other special clubs, but one class that people forget is band. Band is a class that unlike orchestra, has modern instruments.

"I love teaching band, I've always been drawn to different music," said Mr. David Booth, band teacher at Springville Junior High.  Mr. Booth has been teaching band for 14 years now and counting; 14 years which he has very much enjoyed and is still enjoying to this day.
     
"I can get around on most instruments, but have the most background on brass instruments," said Mr Booth.  In order to qualify to be a band teacher, teachers have to know how to play different instruments; this is something that Mr. Booth is very good at.

"I really like band because I get to make noise, and Mr. Booth is awesome," said Steven Nunn, a band student.  For years Mr. Booth has taught many students, all which come out with a lot of good, fun memories; plus new knowledge of music.

"I plan on teaching at Springville Junior High for many, many years to come.  Students at  Springville Junior High are the best!" said Mr. Booth

 

Future Writers of SJHS

Attributions: 
Julie Barbosa, SJHS Staff Writer

Have you ever had that warm feeling? The feeling of pride and joy when you finish reading a book or an essay. Well, this feeling is all too familiar to the Creative Writing class at Springville Junior High.

Creative writing is an elective here at Springville Junior High, where students have the opportunity to write and express their feelings. Ms. Rachel Neeley, seventh grade English teacher, has been teaching creative writing for two years, and said, “I love teaching an elective. It’s fun! I love reading all the amazing things my students write. It is a great class. If you like to write, sign up!” 

Rachel Standley, eighth grader, agreed saying, “I took this class so I could be a better writer, there you can express your feelings freely.”  This class is open to all students who share there love for writing. Ninth-grader Sariah Morris said, “We do a different subject every two weeks, whether it's historical or scary. It’s really cool.”

With the freedom to explore the world of writing, students not only have fun, but learn new and interesting things. So you never know, one of these wonderful writers could end up as a  journalist, publisher, or maybe even an author. The possibilities are endless for these students and many others here at Springville Junior High.

 

Learning and teaching math at SJHS

Attributions: 
Christopher Taylor, SJHS Staff Writer

Every year in school brings changes, but math is something that remains constant for your entire education. SJHS is just like any other school in this regard.  However, our school is different from others because of the kids and teachers that participate in the math program. We not only learn, but many kids have fun as well.

There are five different math classes offered at SJHS: Seventh grade math, Pre Algebra, Algebra 1a, Algebra 1, and Geometry. Next year there will also be an Algebra 2 class. The classes are similar in many aspects, but move at different paces. Seventh grade math is a slower paced Pre-Algebra, and Pre Algebra and Algebra 1a are slower oaced  versions of Algebra 1.  According to Mr. Dallin Krebs, an Algebra 1 teacher, his class is fun because it is like solving a puzzle.  Geometry takes the things that you learned in Algebra 1 (as well as the preceding classes) and applies them to real life.  Mrs. Corrin Gleave, the Geometry and Algebra 1a teacher said that “Geometry is my favorite! You get all the satisfaction of solving for x, but you also get the shapes, colors and, wait for it... ANGLES!”

Teachers are probably one of the most important factors in learning math. Students at SJHS feel that we have very helpful teachers. Many teachers feel the same way about the kids at our school. Mrs. Kaycie Sorenson, a new math teacher at SJHS, said “The students are great, they are so excited and willing to learn, which makes it 100 times better for me!”  An example of this willingness to learn is seen in Lear Burton, an eighth grader.  He said, “I like being in Geometry because it’s fun and it makes me feel high and mighty to be in an advanced math class.”

Mr. Blakey Does Double Duty at SJHS

Attributions: 
Jacob Simmons, SJHS Staff Writer
Mr. Shaun Blakey

Springville Junior High School is committed to excellence, it is in their “Knight’s Code.” One of the many people who help make the school so great is Mr. Shaun Blakey, counselor and boys' basketball coach.

Mr. Blakey was born and raised in Springville, Utah, and graduated from Springville High. After high school he went on to get a bachelors degree in business marketing, and a masters degree in counseling from the University of Phoenix. He then came to SJHS to be a counselor.

Aside from being a counselor, Mr. Blakey coaches the boys basketball team at SJHS. He starts his second season as coach this September, although he has been involved with basketball even during the summer. During the summer, Mr. Blakey opened the gym for students to have a place to go to practice and play.  He is still involved now. After school each day except Wednesday, he opens the gym for students to go play and learn. “I’m looking forward to a fun and successful year,” Mr. Blakey said, referring to the ninth grade team.

Outside of school and basketball, Mr. Blakey enjoys spending time with his family, and going on vacations. Some of his favorite vacation spots are Disneyland and Park City, however, he likes going anywhere to spend time with his family.

Mr. Blakey has also worked in sales and retail management, and while in high school he worked at a daycare. Besides being a counselor, his favorite job was working at the daycare, “I loved working with the kids and going on the fun field trips with them during the summer,” he said. Obviously, he knew from an early age that he would like to work with children.

Girls Dance their Hearts Out in PE

Attributions: 
Katya Wagstaff, SJHS Staff Writer

Girls taking Physical Education at Springville Junior High have started a dance unit.  This unit gives them a chance to try something besides what they consider “normal” sports.  The girls choose group members and choreograph a dance to music of their choice. 

Some may wonder why Mrs. Kelly Anderson, the girls' P.E. instructor, strays from a curriculum of traditional sports such as soccer and volleyball.  Mrs. Anderson said, “I think the girls really enjoy being creative and performing the dances.” 

Just because Mrs. Anderson lets the girls use their creativity doesn't mean there aren't rules for them to abide by.  The rules are as follows: the dance must be two to three minutes long, props may be used, no cost to anyone can be involved, music must be school-appropriate, the dance is performed in front of the class, and if you are absent on performance day, you get a zero unless there are extenuating circumstances. 

Girls have opposing opinions on whether or not normal sports are better than the dance unit.  Anna Bunnell, a seventh grader, thinks normal sports are better, she’s not really into dancing, and Kourtney Joyner, an eighth grader, think it's more fun to do sports.  On the other side of the debate is Darby Farr, an eighth grader.  She likes dance because you can “express yourself in different ways.”  Another eighth grader that prefers dance is Madison Joyner.  She said, “Dance is funner.  You get to have more fun, and it’s not as competitive.”
 

Students Research the World in Geography

Attributions: 
Max Schreiner, SJHS Writer Staff

Students are working hard in Mrs. Rebecca Murdock’s Geography class trying to get their country projects done. These projects will be presented in class on October 28th or 29th. Right now the Geography class is doing a unit on the Middle East so each student was assigned a country from the Middle East. Mrs. Murdock, the Geography teacher, said “I expect each student’s best work. They have an option to choose which type of project they would like to do, so I expect that they'll have fun while learning.”

“I’m doing Egypt because it’s the one I knew most about in this area,” said Katie Bair, a member of the class. She went on to say, “for my presentation I am going to dress my friends up like Egyptians and make them Egyptian food.”
 
Although the Middle East isn’t home to the most well know countries in the world, students are learning to make it work. Chelsea Ricks, a member of the geography class, said, “ I'm doing a country called Qutar, I hadn't ever even heard of Qutar until I was assigned it as my country project, for my presentation I'm planning on making a recipe from Qutar.” This is an individual project, but some students have the same country, so they can work on a project together but turn in two separate projects.
 

SIS Grading System Training on October 21 at SJHS

Attributions: 
Kara Dunn, SJHS Staff Writer

With the end of the term quickly approaching, one of the biggest concerns parents and students face is grades.  Nebo District uses S.I.S., an online program, to track student attendance and grades.  Springville Junior High is hosting a training program for parents all throughout Nebo district on October 21, at 7:00 p.m. at Springville Junior High (165 South 700 East). This training program should be an easy walk through with two translators handy to answer questions or concerns.

Bilingual posters have been placed around Springville to inform parents about this meeting. It should be very informative and a lot of help to anyone who is struggling. Springville Junior High is excited to teach and help parents understand how easy this process is to check up on their students.   
 

SJHS Goes Red for the Week

Attributions: 
Chelsea Ricks, SJHS Staff Writer

Last week at SJHS, the students showed their commitment to not getting involved with drugs. The Service Learning class gave out the dress up days and themes for the week.  Monday was spirit day, “Show your spirit by not doing drugs.” Students dressed up in their school colors to show their school spirit. Tuesday was hero day, “Be someone else's hero, and don’t do drugs.” Wednesday was sports day, “Be athletic, not pathetic, and don’t do drugs.” Thursday was swap day, “Dress as your favorite teacher and your teachers will dress as you, swap drugs for education.” Friday was crazy day, “Go crazy on candy not drugs.”

Students at SJHS think it’s important to not do drugs because, “drugs can ruin your life,” said Cami Sumsion, a student at SJHS.   The students of Service Learning made Red Ribbon Week possible. They came with the days of the week and put up posters that said “Don’t Do Drugs” so students would realize that drugs are not good for them.
 

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