November 2012

Knightly Virtue: Knowledge

Attributions: 
Marynda J. Chipman, SJHS Staff Writer

Every month at Springville Junior High School a knightly virtue is chosen.  Having a knightly virtue challenges students to strive to become better people.  Throughout the month, teachers look for students that are good examples of that month’s virtue.  The students that are chosen by the most teachers receive the Super Knight Award.  At the beginning of each Super Knight Assembly, a video is shown on the virtue for the next month.  In the video, the student council narrates a few famous quotes on the subject.  The virtue for November is knowledge.

Mrs. Maughan, English teacher at SJHS, said, “I would define knowledge as learning something new, gaining wisdom, and applying it.  To have knowledge makes you a more well-rounded person.  It doesn't necessarily just mean you're smart, but you know more about the world and others to make wise choices.” 

According to Sarah Mitchell, a ninth grader at Springville Junior High School, knowledge is power, and no one can succeed without knowledge.

Students who go the Extra Mile Recognized at SJHS

Attributions: 
Sadie Clark, SJHS Staff Writer
October Super Knights, left to right: Jane Shoemaker, Pamela, Lopez, Megan Gashler, Tyler Anderson, Jaden Gulbransen, and Spencer McQueen.

Every month the teachers at Springville Junior High carefully select six Super Knights. They choose two students from each grade, one boy and one girl. The teachers at SJHS nominate these students and vote. According to Mr. Krebs, a math teacher at SJHS, he picks students that “reflect the attributes of what a Knight should be.” Teachers base their choices on SJHS’s Desired Results for Student Learning (DRSL’s) and the monthly virtue. The DRSL’s at SJHS are: learning to be Effective Communicators, Responsible Citizens, and Successful Learners. The monthly virtue for October is courage. Ms. Miley, an English teacher, said, “So many students at our school do great things every day, so it's exciting to see who will be recognized in the assembly each month.”

The seventh-grade girl that was named a Super Knight is Jane Shoemaker. Her teachers said that she “Always, always, always volunteers an answer, and its typically a deep-thinking answer as well. Works well with others and is very nice and respectful.” Another teacher said, “Jane Shoemaker always has a smile on her face. She comes to class with a great attitude and is helpful at explaining things to students who are a little confused.”

The seventh-grade boy that was named a Super Knight is Spencer McQueen. According to Spencer, Super Knights need to be nice to others in order to be elected. “Spencer McQueen is someone I can count on. I know he is going to do his class work and do it the best he can,” said one teacher. “He gets his work done very quickly, but with good quality. He is very willing to help others understand what they are learning,” said another one.

The eighth-grade girl that was named a Super Knight is Megan Gashler. One of her teachers said, “She has showed courage by being willing to participate and share her opinions. She has showed courage by standing up for herself and the learning environment when there has been disrespect toward the learning time.” Another teacher said, “Megan works really hard in my class. She's always cheerful and happy, and will do anything I ask her to do. She's very helpful and will go the extra mile. Also, Megan does the best push-ups EVER and can do many of them.” Megan was excited to hear she was elected; she said, “It means a lot, I never expected teachers to say those things about me!”

The eighth-grade boy that was named a Super Knight is Tyler Anderson. One of his teachers said, “What I love about him is that when he is learning, he smiles. The light bulb goes off above his head, and he smiles. It is a wonderful gift for me to be able to see that.”  Another teacher said, “He has showed courage by being an example of a model student. It's refreshing to have a student at this age know who he is and not be afraid to go after his aspirations.”

The ninth-grade girl that was named a Super Knight is Pamela Lopez. According to Pamela, you need to work hard in school to be a Super Knight. One of her teachers said, “Pamela is a very bright and dedicated student. She always has a smile on her face and works hard to accomplish anything she sets out to do.” Another teacher said, “Pamela is a great example of a Super Knight because she is a good student, positive, energetic, and extremely helpful. Congratulations Pamela!”

The ninth-grade boy that was named a Super Knight is Jaden Gulbransen. One of his teachers said, “Jaden is a very hard worker. He is always listening to the teacher and trying his hardest even when he doesn't know how to do something. He is a good example to other students in my class. He is always respectful.” Another teacher said, “Jaden Gulbransen is a hard worker, and he tries hard to do what's right.”

These students are the epitome of the DRSL’s and the value of courage. “You don't have to be an ‘A’ student to be a Super Knight, but you do have to be constantly trying and improving,” said Mr. Mikesell, the dean of students.

The Amazing Ms. Hamilton

Attributions: 
Ceci Sumsion, SJHS Staff Writer
Ms. Hamilton

Ms. Hamilton, a veteran teacher at SJHS, is very nice and a lot of fun to talk to. Ms. Hamilton teaches eighth and ninth grade English and math. She has been teaching at SJHS for fourteen years. She also does a study hall for the students at SJHS, and is in charge of a after school program for some students SJHS that have health problems or for some reason can’t come to school. On top of all that she helps with the Super Knights. Ms. Hamilton wanted to be a teacher because she wanted to help kids who struggle. “My favorite part about teaching is the kids, I love all of the personalities,” said Ms. Hamilton. 

Josh Johnson, a student at SJHS, said, “She’s nice and helps you out if you’re not getting it.”  According to Jasmine Puerta, her favorite part about Ms.Hamilton's class is how Ms. Hamilton tries to explain and help you understand; Mrs. Hamilton also makes others feel smart. 

Here are a few facts to help you get to know Ms. Hamilton. First off she loves animals.  Ms. Hamilton said, “My favorite animal right now would probably be sloths.” But her favorite house pet are dogs. She actually has two dogs, Otis, who is a Yorkie, and Hatch who is a shih-tzu. Her favorite holiday is Thanksgiving, and she has a neon green toothbrush with stripes. Ms. Hamilton is an amazing teacher and super nice. Thanks for all you do Ms. Hamilton!

Seventh Graders at SJHS Create Mechanical Arms

Attributions: 
Marin Rosenberg, SJHS Staff Writer
McKenna Whitby, Michael Bravo, Maria Armirez, and Benton Aegerter posing with some mechanical arms on Halloween.

On September 24th, Mr. Rencher, CTE teacher at Springville Junior High School, talked to his students about a new project that they were required to do. All tudents in the Technology Education class were assigned to construct a mechanical arm out of certain materials like pvc pipes and whatnot. The seventh graders would then test them out on October 18th.        

Some people have lost limbs on their bodies, and sometimes they have to get robotic/mechanical parts to replace them. Students in Mr. Rencher’s class were able to use their own mechanical arms to grab a piece of candy from the bottom of a jug. The point of the project was to test the students mechanical abilities and engineering talents. McKenna Whitby, Michael Bravo, Maria Armirez, and Benton Aegerter, all students in Mr. Rencher’s CTE class, were all able to complete their mechanical arms. All of them agree that the assignment was fun to work on. Michael Bravo said, “The majority of the class made them. You couldn’t go to the store and buy a kit to build them, you had to make them from scratch.” Maria Armirez also thought that the project was fun, and she said, “It wasn’t a competition, and to prepare us for it, Mr. Rencher had us watch videos about mechanical arms and look at some of his old ones.” Benton Aegerter and McKenna Whitby both agreed that it was a fun project and that it helped them know what it was like to have just one arm. 

Mr. Rencher’s class has finished their task, but the next two trimester classes will have to do it as well. Good luck! 

Springville Junior High’s Fabulous Band

Attributions: 
Chloe Wilson, SJHS Staff Writer
Mr. Booth directs the eighth grade band.

Who can play over 10 different instruments? Who can make even tedious and repetitive practices cool and fun? Who is the best storyteller in the school? Introducing Mr. Booth, Springville Junior High’s band director!

Mr. Booth said, “My favorite part of band is seeing the students improve their talents and watching pieces of music come together.” He loves teaching and playing his guitar, and he tries to pick fun songs that students will enjoy. Josh Rasmussen, an eighth-grade band student, remarked, “The pieces that we play are fun, and I like being challenged so that I can get better.” 

Band students are preparing for their coming concerts. The songs they are currently playing include: music from Wicked, Eye of the Tiger, and a Christmas Medley for 9th grade; Swahili Folk Hymn, I Want to Hold Your Hand (by the Beatles), and Yule Play the Classics for 8th grade; and Power Rock (We Will Rock You and Another One Bites the Dust), and Centurion for 7th grade.

Kielle Popham, an eighth-grade percussionist, said that she enjoys percussion because she likes to play a variety of instruments. She also enjoys playing and talking to her friends. Kelsie Taylor, a ninth-grade percussionist, said, “I play percussion because we get to play a lot of different instruments and we have unique parts.” She added that she is excited to participate in the festival that ninth graders get to be in. “It should be awesome!” she said.  Maryanne Cheney, an SJHS eighth grader, explained that she plays the clarinet because she thinks it sounds the best. She likes how Mr. Booth is always “fun and happy and cool.” 

Although the band works really hard, all the practice is worth it. Overall, students enjoy performing in assemblies and concerts. Many are excited for the festivals. They love the songs that they are working on. Zach Folette, a seventh-grade band member, said that his favorite is Centurion. “It’s a really powerful song,” he said. Zach is excited for the future concerts. Courtney  Chadwick, an eighth-grade clarinet player, said that her favorite part is “just learning a lot of new songs. Just playing.” She wanted to play the clarinet because she has lots of family members who play it, too. 

Can Mr. Booth’s awesomeness even be measured? Experts are pretty stumped, but Josh Rasmussen has found a way. He puts it simply: “Chuck Norris wears Mr. Booth’s pajamas.”

Spotlight: Mrs. Packer

Attributions: 
Bailey Patterson, SJHS Staff Writer
Mrs. Packer, the new seventh- and eighth-grade Math teacher at SJHS

Here at Springville Junior High we are Effective Communicators, Responsible Citizens, and Successful Learners.  Well, Mrs. Packer, who teaches seventh- and eighth-grade math is also all of those things. Savannah Grant, an eighth-grade student in Mrs. Packer’s seventh period class, said, “She’s a really good teacher, she doesn't lose any of our assignments.’’ 

Mrs. Packer was raised in Orem and Spanish Fork, and she really enjoys being a math teacher here at SJHS.  Mrs. Packer said, “Teaching math is something I've always wanted to do in life.” Her purpose in teaching math to eighth and seventh graders is that she really wants to help students how to learn math and help them understand math and realize how useful it is.         

Another eighth grader who is attending her class, Shyann Molster, said, “She really does a great job at teaching the way the whole class would understand.” So far Mrs. Packer is having a great time teaching here at SJHS, and we hope she stays for a long time and fulfills her math teaching dream.

History Students get Creative and Accurate

Attributions: 
Tiana Spencer, SJHS Staff Writer
Eighth graders showing off their maps. From left to right: Kiana Archibald, Mckella Goff, Seth Mortensen, Tanner Shields, Yaira Esponoza, and Ocany Padilla.

How many students know where our country’s regions are? What about major lakes? Or even the names of those lakes? Well, one thing's for sure, history teacher Mr. Shields’s students at Springville Junior High do!  This project is a big part of students’ grades, and is intended to give students an experience of what it is like to make an accurate map. 

This assignment comes with some requirements. Students needed to draw the outline of the United States, draw some major rivers, lakes, mountain ranges, bodies of water, physical regions, and a key. This assignment helped students with knowing where important things are, knowing the names of those important things.

According to Teresa Morse, an eighth grader in Mr. Shields’s class, it was a fun assignment because students were able to work on it with a friend and to use their creativity. Students got to work on it with a friend in class, AND stretch their creativity level. A couple of creative ideas that students used on their poster were candy, string, food, glitter, and aquarium rocks.

This project ended with so many different ways to help students, such as getting smarter, and getting more creative. According to Teresa Morse, it wasn’t a hard assignment; it was fun and easy to follow.

The Fun Filled 4H Clubs

Attributions: 
Tanika Farrar, SJHS Staff Writer
SJHS students attend 4H clubs after school.

4H is a gathering for students in SJHS. 4H is a bunch of clubs for students to have fun. “It means meeting new students and helping them find what they are interested in,” said Mrs. Davenport, a tracker at SJHS, and a leader in 4H.

4H helps students from seventh to ninth grade learn new things and have fun after school in the cafeteria. There are many of clubs to choose from and every term the club leaders have new clubs. The clubs now are: Edible Arts, Outdoor Sports, Mad Scientist, Yoga, and Trivia. 

In the 4H clubs they have a pledge for the clubs that they have to learn and say every single day.The 4H pledge is, “I pledge my head to clearer thinking, My heart to greater loyalty, my hands to larger service, and my health for better living, for my club, my community, my country, and my world.”

There are students and teachers in these 4H activities that put their own spare time into these fun filled classes. The teachers in these activities are, Mrs. Davenport, Mrs. Allen, Mrs.Kent, and Whitney. “I feel welcomed, I’m just happy in these classes, and it gives me something to do.” said Harmony Willson, a seventh grader that goes to 4H five days a week.

Preparing for the Candlelight at SJHS

Attributions: 
Sadie Clark, SJHS Staff Writer

Every Tuesday during Quest Time many of the eighth-grade and ninth-grade Knightingales sing their hearts out to prepare for their Candlelight concert this December. The Candlelight concert is on December 5th. The Knightingales are performing with the Master Singers (9th graders) and the Journeymen (8th grade boys). The Knightingales have been working diligently with Mrs. Walker, the choir director, to improve their singing skills since the start of school.

“I love music,” said Maggie Anderson, a Knightingale at SJHS. The songs that the Knightingales are currently singing include: One Candle, O Come Emmanuel, and The Light of Christmas. Lauryn Ethington, another Knightingale, said, “My favorite song is One Candle because it’s very emotional.”

According to these girls, they really love to sing. “You are the instrument!” said Lauren Biesinger, a Knightingale. Many of these students look forward to this enrichment activity each week. They sure enjoy this opportunity to have fun and to make music!

Students Teach in Foods Class

Attributions: 
Austen Moon, SJHS Staff Writer
Michael Nelson demonstrating French toast in Mrs. Luke’s foods class.

At Springville Junior High, students get to show what they’ve learned in Mrs. Luke’s foods class by preparing a food of their choice in front of the class for their classmates to sample.  “There are two main reasons we do food demos,” said Mrs. Luke. “First of all, so I know that the students know how to measure.  The other reason is so that I know that students have learned in foods class.”  Food demos take place on Thursdays and Fridays near the end of each term.  According to Mrs. Luke, she wasn’t the one who came up with the idea; the school was already doing food demos when she started teaching here.

The rules for students’ food demos are fairly simple. Students have to prepare their food in class, and talk about what they are doing as they work.  They must prepare enough food to provide samples for the whole class (and Mrs. Luke), but the demonstration should be kept to about seven to ten minutes if possible.  After their presentations, students have to clean up any mess they made during their demos.  Finally, they have to have a recipe card for their food to give to Mrs. Luke.

According to Mrs. Luke, she has seen so many amazing food demos that it is hard to pick out her favorite.  Some of Mrs. Luke’s favorites are: naan (an African bread), egg rolls, sushi, and curry, which is a type of food made in India.  The food demos are popular with students, too.  According to Emma Page and Cooper Halladay, ninth graders at SJHS, Oreo Truffles and Icelandic pancakes stand out as two of the best foods they have ever had in foods class.  “One of the best things about foods demos is that I actually get to learn new recipes, too,” said Mrs. Luke.  “I can take the recipe cards home and try them out for myself.”

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